Student Resources

Patrons of the Abbey’s library include the students, faculty and staff of Mount Angel Seminary, scholars and religious professionals of many denominations, and any interested person who requests user and borrower privileges.

Primo and Ebsco

Primo allows you to search the library’s online catalog for print books and ebooks. Ebsco allows you to search for journal articles.

Important: Full text is only available to Mount Angel Abbey monks, students, faculty and staff. For best viewing, the latest version of Firefox browser is recommended.

Subject Guides

The library staff has prepared several subject guides intended to be used as a general introduction to the subject, a research aid, a guide to World Wide Web sources, and a guide to holdings contained in the library. For further assistance with these and other subjects, please contact the reference librarian.




Subject Guides

Below are links to a variety of subject guides prepared by the staff of Mount Angel Abbey Library. They are intended as a general introduction to the subject, a research aid, a guide to World Wide Web sources, and a guide to holdings contained in the library.

American Civil War

PDF bibliography guide

Christian Vocation to Single Life Bibliography

A Guide to Resources in the Mount Angel Abbey Library

Updated September, 2010

This bibliography includes material which relate to lay single vocations, as well as to the married vocation and vocations to the priesthood or religious life.

Unfortunately Doohan’s “The Laity: A Bibliography”, which might have been very helpful, does not have a chapter devoted to the single lay vocation.

It is worth noting that in 1987 the Synod on the Laity produced a work which explores the meaning of the Christian vocation. The document is entitled Christifideles laici, which translates as “Lay Members of Christ’s Faithful People.” It was published on a symbolic date, December 30, 1988, which was the Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph. This subject guide includes several books which involve that document, as well as a web-link to the entire document, via the Vatican website.

Contents

  • General Texts about Christian Vocations
  • Web-based / Internet Resources

General Texts about Christian Vocations

Catholic Church. One Body: Different Gifts, Many Roles: Reflections on the American Catholic Laity. Washington, D.C: United States Catholic Conference, 1987.

—. The Congress of Catholic Laity. Vatican City: Pontifical Council for the Laity, 2002.

—. The Vocation and the Mission of the Lay Faithful in the Church and in the World: Christifideles Laici ; Post-Synodal Exhortation December 30, 1988. Washington, D.C: Office of Publishing and Promotion Services, United States Catholic Conference, 1989.

Catholic Church, and Catholic Church. Called and Gifted: The American Catholic Laity ; Reflections of the American Bishops Commemorating the Fifteenth Anniversary of the Issuance of the Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity. National Conference of Catholic Bishops, 1980.

—. Vocation and Mission of the Laity in the Church and in the World Twenty Years After the Second Vatican Council ; Lineamenta. Washington, D.C: United States Catholic Conference, Office of Publishing and Promotion Services, 1985.

Catholic Church, and United States Catholic Conference. Called and Gifted for the Third Millenium: Reflections of the U.S. Catholic Bishops on the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity and the Fifteenth Anniversary of Called and Gifted. Washington, DC: United States Catholic Conference, 1995.

Catholic Identity and the Laity. Maryknoll, N.Y: Orbis Books, 2009.

Challenge to the Laity. Huntington, Ind: Our Sunday visitor, 1980.

Coughlan, Peter, and Catholic Church. The Hour of the Laity: Their Expanding Role: Exploring “Christifideles Laici” the Pope’s Key Document on the Laity. Newton, NSW, Australia: E.J. Dwyer, 1989.

Cruz, Joan Carroll. Saintly Men of Modern Times. Huntington, Ind: Our Sunday Visitor, 2003.

De la Bedoyere, Michael. The Layman in the Church. Chicago: H. Regnery Co, 1955.

Doohan, Leonard. Laity’s Mission in the Local Church: Setting a New Direction. 1st ed. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1986.

—. The Laity: A Bibliography. Wilmington, Del: Michael Glazier, 1987.

Dwelling in the House of the Lord: Catholic Laity and Spiritual Tradition. St. Louis, Mo: Review for Religious, 2000.

Finley, James. Your Future & You: Marriage– Priesthood, Religious Life, Single Life? Notre Dame, Ind: Ave Maria Press, 1981.

Flood, Edmund. The Laity Today and Tomorrow. New York: Paulist Press, 1987.

Foley, Gerald K. Empowering the Laity. Kansas City, Mo: Sheed and Ward, 1986.

Gornick, Thomas W, and Christian in the World. Christifideles Laici: Go and Make Disciples — the Role of the Lay Faithful Today. St. Benedict, OR: Mount Angel Abbey, 2004.

John Paul II. John Paul II and the Laity. Le Jacq, 1984.

Kinast, Robert L. Caring for Society: A Theological Interpretation of Lay Ministry. Chicago: Thomas More Press, 1985.

Lakeland, Paul. Catholicism at the Crossroads: How the Laity Can Save the Church. New York: Continuum, 2007.

Niemann, Martha M. The Single Life: A Christian Challenge. Liguori, Mo: Liguori Publications, 1986.

Oliver, Robert W. The Vocation of the Laity to Evangelization: An Ecclesiological Inquiry into the Synod on the Laity (1987), Christifideles Laici (1989), and Documents of the NCCB (1987-1996). Roma: Editrice Pontificia Università Gregoriana, 1997.

Synod on the Laity: An Unfinished Agenda. PILLAR, 1988.

The Layman in the Church. New York: Herder and Herder, 1962.

Unger, Dominic J. The Mystery of Love for the Single. Chicago: Franciscan Herald Press, 1958.

Vatican Council. Laymen: Vatican II’s Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity. Chicago: Catholic Action Federations, 1966.

Whitehead, James D. The Emerging Laity: Returning Leadership to the Community of Faith. 1st ed. Garden City, N.Y: Doubleday, 1986.

Web-based / Internet Resources

Ecumenism Bibliography

American Church Records Series

Mount Angel Abbey Library is a charter subscriber to the American Church Records Series compiled by A.T. DeGroot. It includes a number of ecumenical journals on microfilm (interfiled with the rest of the periodicals on microform) as well as retrospective and current records and statistics for the Christian churches of the United States and the rest of the English-speaking world. All these records are on microfilm in the Patristic and Latin Christian Studies Room.

Selected Reference Works

  • Dictionary of the Ecumenical Movement. Ed. Nicholas Lossky, et. al. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991. A fine one-volume encyclopedia prepared by the WCC.
  • Encyclopedia of Religion. 2nd ed. Detroit, Mich.: Thomson/Gale, 2005.
  • Melton, J. Gordon. Encyclopedia of American Religions. 6th ed. Detroit, Mich : Gale Research Co., 1999.
  • World Christian Encyclopedia. 2nd ed. Ed. David Barrett. Oxford: Oxford U P, 2001. A gold mine of data on the Christian churches of every country in the world.

Selected Books

  • The Ecumenical Movement: an Anthology of Key Texts and Voices. Ed. Michael Kinnomon and Brian Cope. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 1997.
  • The Ecumenical Revolution: an Interpretation of the Catholic-Protestant Dialogue.. Ed. Robert McAfee Brown. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1967.
  • The Future of Ecumenism. Ed. Hans Küng. New York: Paulist, 1969.
  • A history of the ecumenical movement. 2nd ed. Ed. Ruth Rouse and Stephen Neill. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1967.
  • Introduction to Ecumenism. Ed. Jeffrey Gros, et al. New York: Paulist, 1998.
  • Lange, Ernst. And Yet It Moves : Dream and Reality of the Ecumenical Movement. tr. by Edwin Robertson. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 1979.
  • The Sense of Ecumenical Tradition: the Ecumenical Vision and Witness of the Orthodox. Ed. Ion Bria. Geneva : WCC Publications, 1991.
  • The unity we have and the unity we seek : ecumenical prospects for the third millennium . Ed. Jeremy Morris. London : T & T Clark, 2003.

Journals (General)

  • Ecumenical Review (World Council of Churches) This is the WCC’s premier journal of theology.
  • Ecumenical Trends (Graymoor Ecumenical Institute). The Graymoor Friars, who originated as an Anglican religious order and joined the Roman Catholic church, publish this helpful newsletter about ecumenical developments.
  • Irénikon (Chevetogne). A scholarly theological journal published by a monastery which has long been in the forefront of Catholic-Orthodox relations. In French.
  • Istina (Paris). Another scholarly journal in French, concerned primarily with the Orthodox church.
  • Journal of Ecumenical Studies (Philadelphia). Wide-ranging viewpoint has reflected liberal Catholic theology.
  • One in Christ (England). A venerable English ecumenical journal.
  • Ostkirliche Studien (Würzburg).
  • SIDIC (Service international de documentation Judéo-Chrétienne (Rome).
  • Sobornost (England). (Incorporating Eastern Churches Quarterly)
  • Una Sancta (Germany). A German ecumenical journal, not to be confused with a now defunct American Lutheran journal of the same name.

Journals of Confessional History and Theology

The library subscribes to non-denominational theological journals, which accept contributions from many points of view; these are not included here. Rather, what follows is a list of journals in the library which consistently present the history and theology of a specific Christian denomination or tradition.

Exegesis Bibliography

Exegesis – Books

Atlases
  • Hammond’s Atlas of the Bible Lands. Ed. Harry T. Frank. Maplewood, NJ: Hammond, 1977. (Oversize G2230 .H3 1977)
  • The Harper Atlas of the Bible. Ed. James B. Pritchard. New York: Harper and Row, 1987. (Atlas G2230 .H47 1987)
  • Macmillan Bible Atlas. New York: Macmillan, 1993. (Ref G2230 .A2 1993)
  • Oxford Bible Atlas Ed. Herbert G. May. New York: Oxford University Press, 1984. (BS630 .O93 1984)
Bible
  • The Greek New Testament Ed. Kurt Aland. London: United Bible Societies, 1966. (BS1965 1966)
  • The Holy Bible, Revised Standard Version. New York: Nelson, 1952. (BS191 .A1 1952)
  • The New American Bible. Nashville: Catholic Bible Press, 1987. (BS192.3 .A1 1987)
  • The New Jerusalem Bible. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1985. (BS195 .J413 1985)
  • The New Oxford Annotated Bible (New Revised Standard) with the Apocryphal/Deutercanonical Books.  New York: Oxford University Press, 1994 (BS191.5 .A1 1994 N49)
  • Novum Testamentum graece Ed. Eberhard Nestle and Kurt Aland. New York: American Bible Society, 1963 (BS1965 1963)
  • Tanakh: A New Translation of the Holy Scriptures According to the Tradition Hebrew Text. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Socity, 1985. (BS895 .J4 1985)
Bible Commentaries
  • The Anchor Bible. Series; catalogued under individual titles, e.g., Genesis; The Book of Daniel; The Epistles of James, Peter, and Jude. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1964. (BS192.2 .A1 1964 G3)
  • The New Interpreter’s Bible. George Buttrick et al. 12 v. ed. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1994. The scriptures in the King James and Revised Standard Version, with general articles; introduction, exegesis & exposition for each book of the Bible. (Ref BS491.2 .N484 1994)
  • The New Jerome Biblical Commentary. Eds. Raymond Brown, Joseph Fitzmyer, Roland Murphy. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1990. (Ref BS491.2 N485 1990)
Bible Concordances
  • Computer-Konkordanz zum Novum Testamentum Graece. Eds. H. Bachmann and W. Slaby. New York: De Gruyter, 1980. A very thorough computerized work based on the 26th edition of Novum Testamentum Graece by Nestle-Aland and the third edition of The Greek New Testament. (Ref BS2302 .C6 1980)
  • Lisowsky, Gerhard. Konkordanz zum hebräischen Alten Testament. Stuttgart, Privileg. Württ. Bibelanstalt, 1958. A very thorough work which treats the Hebrew Masoretic text in Biblia Hebraica. For the serious exegete. (Ref BS1121 .L55 1958)
  • Morrison, Clinton. An Analytical Concordance to the Revised Standard Version of the New Testament. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1979. A good English concordance based upon an analysis of the RSV N.T.; relates the English to the original Greek. (Ref BS2305 .M67 1979)
  • Nelson’s Complete Concordance of the New American Bible. Ed. Stephen J. Hartdegen. Collegeville: Liturgical, 1977. More than 300,000 entries from both O.T. and N.T. based upon the English of the New American Bible. (BS425 .N36 1977)
  • NRSV Exhaustive Concordance. Metzger, Bruce. Nashville: T. Nelson Publishers, 1991. (Ref BS425 .N453 1991)
  • Strong, James. The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible. New York: Abingdon, 1973. (Ref BS425 .S85 1970)
  • Strong, James. The New Strong’s Guide to Bible Words. Nashville: T. Nelson, 1996. (BS425 .S85 1996)
Bible Dictionaries
  • The Anchor Bible Dictionary. 6 vol. New York: Doubleday, 1992. (Ref BS440 .A54 1992)
  • Browning, W.R.F. A Dictionary of the Bible. New York: Oxford Press, 1996. (BS440 .B73 1996)
  • Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible. London: SPCK; Baker Academic, 2005 (Ref BS440 .D495 2005)
  • Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament Eds. Horst Balz and Gerhard Schneider. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 1990-. (Ref BS2312 .E913)
  • Expository Dictionary of Bible Words: word studies for key English words based on the Hebrew and Greek texts. Ed. Stephen D. Renn. Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson, 2005 (Ref BS440 .E97 2005) This is also available on CD-ROM.
  • Harper’s Bible Dictionary. Ed. Paul Achtemeier, et al. San Francisco: Harper, 1985. (Ref BS440 .H231 1985)
  • The Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible. Ed. George Buttrick et al. 4 vol. & suppl. New York: Abingdon, 1962. (Ref BS440 .I63)
  • McKenzie, John L. Dictionary of the Bible Milwaukee: Bruce, 1965. (Ref BS440 .M36)
  • Theological Dictionary of the Old Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1974-86. 15 vol. (Ref BS440 .T43 E5)
    Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1964-76. 10 vol. (Ref BS2312 .T43 E5)
    These two are a rather complete treatment of the significant religious and theological words found in the Bible. The latter half of the O.T. work is still being compiled. An excellent tool for exegesis.
  • Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament. Chicago: Moody Press, 1980. (Ref BS440 .T49 1980)
  • Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Biblical Words. Nashville: T. Nelson, 1985. (Ref BS537 .E96 1985)
Encyclopedias
  • The Encyclopedia of Judaism. (Ref BM50 .E63 1999)
  • Encyclopedia Judaica. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2007. (Ref DS102.8 .E496 2007)
  • The Jewish Encyclopedia. Ed. Cyrus Adler and Isidore Singer. New York: KTAV, 1964 (DS102.8 .J65 1964)
  • New Catholic Encyclopedia. 2nd ed. Detroit: Thomas/Gale, 2003. (Ref BX841 .N44 2003
Extra-Biblical Texts
  • Josephus, Flavius. Complete Works. Grand Rapids: Kregel,1981. (DS116 .J7 1981)
  • – – – – The Jewish War. New York: Penguin, 1981. (DS122.8 .J733 1981)
  • The Ancient Near East. Ed. James Pritchard Princeton: Princeton UP, 1973. (Oversize BS1180 .P82)
  • New Testament Apocrypha. Ed. Edgar Hennecke et al. Philadephia: Westminster, 1963-66. (BS2832 .S3 1963)
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha. Ed. James H. Charlesworth. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1983. (BS1830 .A3)
Lexicons
  • The Analytical Greek Lexicon Revised. Ed. Harold K. Moulton. Grand Rapids: Zondervon, 1978. Includes every word of the N.T. exactly as it stands the original text. Provides a complete grammatical analysis. A standard tool for students of the N.T. (Ref PA881 .A5 1979)
  • Davidson, Benjamin. The Analytical Hebrew and Chaldee Lexicon. Grand Rapids: Zondervon, 1970. Every word of the O.T. is exhibited with a free grammatical analysis. A standard tool for students of the O.T. (Ref PJ4833 .D3 1970)
  • Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament. Eds. Francis Brown et al. Oxford: Clarendon, 1978. (Ref PJ4833 .G33)

Exegesis – Periodicals

The Catholic Periodical Literature Index, located on a table near the computer terminals, is helpful in finding articles by subject or author. Elenchus of Biblica is an index, by subject, of current articles; it is found on the shelves with the periodicals. The following periodicals may be found in alphabetical order on the periodical shelves on the first floor:

  • Bible Review
  • Bible Today
  • Biblica
  • Biblical Archeology Review
  • Biblical Interpretation
  • Biblical Research
  • Biblical Theology Bulletin
  • Catholic Biblical Quarterly
  • Elenchus of Biblica
  • Expository Times
  • Interpretation
  • Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
  • Journal for the Study of the New Testament
  • Journal of Biblical Literature
  • * New Testament Abstracts
  • Old Testament Abstracts
  • New Testament Review
  • New Testament Studies
  • Revista Biblica
  • Revista de Interpretacion
  • Revue Biblique
  • Revue de Qumran
  • Vetus Testamentum

Homiletics Bibliography

Homiletics

Whether you’re a student taking your first look at homiletics, or an experienced priest looking for fresh inspiration, Mount Angel Abbey Library has a wealth of resources for you. In fact, there is so much material here that a search of the catalog for “Homiletics” or “Preaching” produces a list of over four hundred records!

To help you locate the resources you need, we’ve identified several subcategories, from books giving general advice on writing or delivering homilies, to commentaries on lectionary readings, or collections of sermons. If you find something here that is particularly helpful to you, please let us know, so we can pass on your recommendations.

General Commentaries

  • The Anchor Bible. Series; also catalogued under individual titles, e.g., Genesis; The Book of Daniel; The Epistles of James, Peter, and Jude. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1964-. (BS 192.2 A1 1964 G3)
  • The International Theological Commentary. Series; Old Testament; catalogued under individual titles. Eds. Frederick Holmgren and George A.F. Knight. Grand Rapids : Eerdmans, 1983-.
  • The Interpreter’s Bible. George Buttrick et al. 12 v. ed. Abingdon, 1952. The scriptures in the King James and Revised Standard Version, with general articles; introduction, exegesis & exposition for each book of the Bible. A bit dated but useful. (BS 491 I65)
  • The New International Commentary on the New Testament. Series. Gen. ed. F.F. Bruce. Grand Rapids : Eerdmans, 1951-. (BS 2341 B83)
  • The New International Commentary on the Old Testament. Series. Gen. ed. R.K. Harrison. Grand Rapids : Eerdmans, 1965-. (BS 1151.2 N48 I155)
  • The New Jerome Biblical Commentary. Eds. Raymond Brown, Joseph Fitzmyer, Roland Murphy. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1990. (BS 491.2 B7)
  • Sacra Pagina. Series; New Testament; catalogued under individual titles. Ed. Daniel J. Harrington. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical, 1991-.

Commentaries on the Sunday Readings

Note that several of the books listed under “Lectionaries” include commentaries on the text.

  • Balthasar, Hans Urs von. Light of the Word: Brief Reflections on the Sunday Readings. San Francisco: Ignatius, 1993. (BX 2170 C55 B25 L513)
  • Coughlan, Peter and Peter Purdue. Commentary on the Sunday Lectionary. 3 vol. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical, 1972. (BX 1756 C68)
  • Crotty, Robert and Gregory Manly. Commentaries on the Readings of the Lectionary: Cycles A, B, C. New York: Pueblo Pub. Co., 1975. (BS 391.2 C76)
  • Ferlita, Ernest. The Paths of Life: Reflections on the Readings for Sundays and Holy Days. New York: Alba House, 1992-4. (BX 2170 C55 F46)
  • Ferlita, Ernest. Sunday Morning Insights. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical, 1984. (BX 2170 C55 F46)
  • Lauer, Eugene F. The Paths of Life: Reflections on the Readings for Sundays and Holy Days. New York: Alba House, 1992-1994. (BX 2170 C55 L366)
  • Nevins, Albert J. The Sunday Readings: Commentaries on the Sunday Liturgies for the Three Cycles, Plus Holy Days and the Supplanting Feasts. Huntington, Ind.: Our Sunday Visitor, 1984. (BX 2170 C55 N48)
  • Sloyan, Gerard Stephen. Commentary on the New Lectionary. New York: Paulist, 1975. (BS 391.2 S58)

Preaching and Social Issues

  • Burghardt, Walter J. Preaching the Just Word. New Haven: Yale UP, 1996. (BX 1913 B8)
  • Hessel, Dieter T. For Creation’s Sake: Preaching, Ecology, and Justice. Philadelphia: Geneva, 1985. (BT 695.5 F74)
  • Sider, Ronald J. and Darrel J. Brubaker. Preaching on Peace. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1982. (BT 736.4 P73)
  • Smith, Christine M. Preaching as Weeping, Confession, and Resistance: Radical Responses to Radical Evil. Louisville, Ky.: Westminster/John Knox, 1992. (BV 4211.2 S623)
  • Hughes, Robert G. A Trumpet in Darkness: Preaching to Mourners. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1985. (BV 4275 H874)

Sermons from the Church Fathers

This is a relatively small sampling of the collections of sermons by the Church Fathers available at the library. Try browsing the catalog under “Sermons, Latin Translations into English” for other early titles. Or look under “Catholic Church Sermons” for collections of sermons spanning the history of the Church.

  • St. Augustine. Sermons on the Liturgical Seasons. Tr. Mary Sarah Muldowney. New York: Fathers of the Church, 1959. (BR 65 A84 A62, F37, v.17)
  • —. Nine Sermons of Saint Augustine on the Psalms. Tr. Edmund Hill. New York: Kennedy, 1959. (BR 65 A84 H555)
  • St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Sermons for the Summer Season: Liturgical Sermons from Rogationtide and Pentecost. Tr. Beverly Kienzle. Kalamazoo, Mich. : Cistercian Pub., 1991. (BX 3415 C497 no.53)
  • St. Bonaventure. What manner of man? Sermons on Christ. Chicago: Franciscan Herald, 1974. (BQT 693 B64)
  • —. Rooted in Faith: Homilies to a Contemporary World. Chicago: Franciscan Herald, 1974. (BR 67 B66 S47513)
  • Carroll, Thomas K. Preaching the Word. Wilmington, Delaware: M. Glazier, 1984. An analysis of different dimensions in the homilies of the Patristic Fathers (liturgical, exegetical, rhetorical, prophetic). With excerpts from sermons by many of the Fathers. (BR 162.2 M562 v.11)
  • Eckhart, Meister. Meister Eckhart: Sermons & Treatises. Tr. and ed. Maurice O’C. Walshe. Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1992. (BV 5080 E3 W3 v.3)
  • St. Gregory the Great. Forty Gospel Homilies. Tr. David Hurst. Kalamazoo, Mich.: Cistercian Pub., 1990. (BX 1076 E5 X5313)
  • St. Jerome. The Homilies of Saint Jerome. 2 vol. Tr. Marie Liguori Ewald. Washington: Catholic U of America, 1964-1966. (BR 65 J5 A62, F37, v.1,2)
  • St. Leo the Great. Sermons. Tr. Jane Patricia Freeland. Washington, DC: The Catholic U of America, 1996. (BR 60 A62 F37 v.93)
  • O’Carroll, Mary E., A thirteenth-century preacher’s handbook. Toronto : Pontifical Inst. of Mediaeval Studies, c1997. (BV 4208 G7 O22)
  • Origen. Homilies on Genesis and Exodus. Tr. Ronald E. Heine. Washington: Catholic U of America, 1982. (BR 65 O544 A62 F37 v.1)
  • Tauler, Johannes. Johannes Tauler, Sermons. Tr. Maria Shrady. New York: Paulist, 1985. (BR 67 T38 S4713)
  • St. Thomas Aquinas. God’s Greatest Gifts: Commentaries on the Commandments and the Sacraments. Manchester, N.H.: Sophia Institute, 1992. (B 765 T5 6860 D82 A4 E5)
  • St. Thomas of Villanova. Sermons. Tr. Maria Boulding. Villanova, PA: Augustinian, 1995. (BX1756.T54 S47)

Story-Telling

  • Bausch, William J. Storytelling the Word: Homilies & How to Write Them. Mystic, CT.: Twenty-Third Publications, c1996. (BX 756 B3493 S76)
  • Ellingsen, Mark. The Integrity of Biblical Narrative: Story in Theology and Proclamation. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1990. (BV 4235 S76 E44)
  • White, William R. Stories for the Journey: a Sourcebook for Christian Storytellers. Minneapolis: Augsburg Pub. House, 1988. Retellings of more than 80 folktales, for use as illustrations in preaching and teaching. Grouped by themes such as “Prayer and Worship”, “Community and Hospitality.” (BT 78 S84)

References

  • Willimon, William H. and Richard Lischer. Concise Encyclopedia of Preaching. Louisville, Ky.: Westminster John Knox, 1995. (Ref BV 4211.2 C583)
  • Old, Hughes Oliphant. The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church. 2 vols. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 1998. Vol. 1 looks at the Church through the Apostolic Age; Vol. 2 covers the Patristic Age. (BV 4207 O43)

Internet Resources

  • Catholic Sermons and Homilies. Although it’s not laid out to facilitate a quick search, this site is well worth exploring. You can find links to valuable resources for sermon preparation, including many sample homilies and illustrations. Wait until you have some time to browse, then pour yourself a cup of coffee and remember to add to your personal list of bookmarks when you find something you like.
  • New American Bible. Provides the full texts of the readings by date, sponsored by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops.
  • The Roman Catholic Lectionary for Mass. Provides comprehensive tables of readings for several editions of the Roman Catholic Lectionary. There are also cross-references and comparative tables so that you can more easily compare the various editions of the Lectionary.
  • Lectionary Texts for Reference and Reflection. The Revised Common Lectionary online, with texts from the NRSV.
  • Weekly Commentaries on the Revised Common Lectionary. For each week’s readings, there is a brief commentary, a short introduction for use in the liturgy, and selections from more technical information about the texts.
  • Christian Classics Ethereal Library. Look here for writings by the Church Fathers, the Catholic Encyclopedia (an online work-in-progress), concordances and commentaries.
  • Sermon Lectionary Resources. An ecumenical index edited by United Church Reverend Richard Fairchild.
  • Meeting Christ in the Liturgy. Weekly reflections on the Scriptures of the Sacred Liturgy and the Catechism of the Catholic Church.
  • Sermons by Fathers of the Church. Easy access to sermons available online by Basil the Great, St. Augustine, St. Ambrose, and others.

Iconography Bibliography

A Guide to Resources in the Mount Angel Abbey Library

Updated November, 2009

The art of iconography has been a tradition of the church for over 1,500 years and is currently seeing a resurgence in the West. Icons are described as “the Gospel in line and color,” a depiction of the Incarnate Word. The close association of word and image is brought out as iconographers refer to their work as being written rather than painted. In the words of Theodore of Studios (759-826 A.D.), “his [Christ’s] image was drawn in writing by the apostles and has been preserved up to the present. Whatever is marked there with paper and ink, the same is marked on the icon with various pigments or some other material. For the great [Saint] Basil says ‘whatever the words of the narrative offer, the picture silently shows by imitation.’ Hearing is equal to sight, and it is necessary to use both.”

In Behold the Beauty of the Lord, Henri Nouwen says “icons…are created for the sole purpose of offering access, through the gate of the visible, to the mystery of the invisible.” “This entry into the world of icons can at the same time be an entry into our own interior life, a passing through the ‘narrow gate’ that leads to Life” writes John Baggley in Doors of Perception.

Following is a partial list of the many books on the subject in the library’s collection, with an emphasis on Byzantine iconography. Among the most recent books, those published since 2000, this list includes a number of “oversize” books, which have excellent quality and relatively large images of icons.

For additional listings do a subject search in the online catalog for

  • Iconography
  • Christian Art
  • Saints — Art

Books on Iconography

Abu Qurrah, Thawdhurus. A Treatise on the Veneration of the Holy Icons. Louvain: Peeters, 1997.

Baggley, John. Doors of Perception: Icons and Their Spiritual Significances. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s, 1988.

Beckett, Wendy. Encounters with God: in quest of the ancient icons of Mary. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2009.

Besançon, Alain. The Forbidden Image: an intellectual history of iconoclasm. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Bihalji-Merin, Oto. Byzantine Frescoes and Icons in Yugoslavia. New York: H.N. Abrams, 1958.

Bouyer, Louis. Vérité des Icônes: la tradition iconographique chrétienne et sa signification. Criterion, 1984.

Bunge, Gabriel. The Rublev Trinity: the icon of the Trinity by the monk-painter Andrei Rublev. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 2007.

Cavarnos, Constantine. Guide to Byzantine Iconography. Boston, Massachusetts: Holy Transfiguration Monastery, 1993.

Chavrukov, Georgi. Bulgarian Monasteries: Monuments of History, Culture, and Art. Sofia: Septemvri, 1978.

Cormack, Robin. Icons. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007.

—. Writing in Gold: Byzantine Society and its Icons. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

Council of Nicaea. Icon and Logos: Sources in Eighth Century Iconoclasm: an Annotated Translation of the Sixth Session of the Seventh Ecumenical Council. Translated, Daniel J. Sahas. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 1986.

Cutler, Anthony. Transfigurations: Studies in the Dynamics of Byzantine Iconography. University Park: Pennsylvania State University, 1975.

Demus, Otto. Byzantine Art and the West. New York: New York University Press, 1970.

DeNoble, Augustine. Brother Joseph: the painter of icons. Bathgate, N.D.: Bethlehem Books ; San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2000.

Doolan, Patrick. Recovering the icon: the life & work of Leonid Ouspensky. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 2008.

Evdokimov, Michel. Light from the East: icons in liturgy and prayer. Mahwah, N.J.: Paulist Press, 2004.

Ferrero Centeno, Fabriciano. The story of an icon: the full history, tradition and spirituality of the popular icon of Our Mother of Perpetual Help. Chawton, Hampshire: Redemptorist Pub., 2001.

Florenskii, P. A. Iconostasis. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 1996.

Galavaris, George. The Icon in the Life of the Church: Doctrine, Liturgy, Devotion. Leiden: Brill, 1981.

Galey, John. Sinai and the Monastery of St. Catherine. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1980.

Giakalis, Ambrosios. Images of the Divine: the Theology of Icons at the Seventh Ecumenical Council. New York: E.J. Brill, 1994.

Gosudarstvennye muzei Moskovskogo Kremlia. Treasures from the Kremlin. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1979.

Holy image, hallowed ground: icons from Sinai. Edited by Robert S. Nelson and Kristen M. Collins. Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2006.

Huber, Paul. Athos: Miraculous Icons. Berne, Hallwag, 1968.

Joannes of Damascus, Saint. On the Divine Images. Translated, David Anderson. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s, 1980.

Jones-Frank, Michael. Iconography and Liturgy. Chicago, Ill.: Liturgy Training Publications, 1994.

Kalokyris, Constantine D. The Essence of Orthodox Iconography. Brookline, Mass.: Holy Cross Orthodox, 1985.

Klymasz, Robert B. The Icon in Canada. Ottawa: Canadian Museum of Civilization, 1996.

Lazarev, Viktor. Old Russian murals & mosaics: From the 11th to the 16th Century. London: Phaidon, 1966.

—. Andrei Rublev. Moskva: Sovetskii khudozhnik, 1960.

—. Novgorodian Icon-Painting. Moskva: Iskusstvo, 1976.

Krekhovetsky, Yakiw E. Jakob. Iconography: faith in color. Toronto, Ont.: Basilian Press, 2006.

McKenzie, A. Dean. Greek and Russian Icons. Milwaukee: University of Wisconsin, 1965.

Monastic visions: wall paintings in the Monastery of St. Antony at the Red Sea / edited by Elizabeth S. Bolman; photography by Patrick Godeau. New Haven, CT: American Research Center in Egypt/Yale University Press, 2002.

Mondzain, Marie-José. Image, icon, economy: the Byzantine origins of the contemporary imaginary. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2005.

Muzj, Maria. Transfiguration: Introduction to the Contemplation of Icons. Boston, MA: St. Paul Books & Media, 1991.

Nes, Solrunn. The Mystical Language of Icons. London: St Pauls, 2000.

—. The uncreated light: an iconographical study of the transfiguration in the Eastern Church. Grand Rapids, Mich.: William B. Eerdmans Pub., 2007.

Nouwen, Henri J.M. Behold the Beauty of the Lord. Notre Dame, Ind.: Ave Maria Press, 1987.

Onasch, Konrad. Russian Icons. Oxford: Phaidon, 1977.

Ouspensky, Leonide. Essai sur la théologie de l’icone dans l’Eglise orthodoxe. Paris, Éditions de l’Exarchat patriarcal russe en Europe occidentale, 1960.

— and Vladimir Lossky. The Meaning of Icons. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s, 1982.

—. Theology of the Icon. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s, 1978.

Papageorgiou, Athenasios. Icons of Cyprus. New York: Cowles, 1970.

Peers, Glenn. Subtle bodies: representing angels in Byzantium. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001.

Playne, Beatrice. St. George for Ethiopia. London, Constable, 1954.

Rice, David Talbot. The Art of Byzantium. New York: Abrams, 1959.

— and Tamara Talbot Rice. Icons and their Dating: a Comprehensive Study of their Chronology and Provenance. London: Thames and Hudson, 1974.

Rice, Tamara Talbot. Russian Icons. London: Spring Books, 1963.

Rublev, Andrei. Rubljov. Milano: Fratelli Fabbri, 1976.

Soloukhin, Vladimir Alekseevich. Searching for Icons in Russia. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1972.

Stylianou, Andreas and Judith A. Stylianou. The Painted Churches of Cyprus. London: Trigraph for the A.G. Leventis Foundation, 1985.

Temple, Richard. Icons: divine beauty. London: Saqi/The Temple Gallery, 2004.

Theodore Studites, Saint. St. Theodore of Studites on the Holy Icons. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s, 1981.

Tradigo, Alfredo. Icons and saints of the Eastern Orthodox Church. Los Angeles: J.P.Getty Museum, 2006.

Trubetskoi, Eugenii Nikolaevich Kniaz. Icons: Theology in Color. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s, 1973.

UNESCO. USSR Early Russian Icons. Greenwich, Conn.: New York Graphic Society by arrangement with UNESCO, 1958.

Uspensky, Boris. The Semiotics of the Russian Icon. Lisse: Peter de Ridder Press, 1976.

Werner, Alfred. Icons: Religious Art of Eastern Europe. New York: A.A. Wyn, 1949.

Weitzmann, Kurt. The Icon. New York: Knopf, 1982.

—. The Icon: Holy Images — Sixth to Fourteenth Century. New York: G. Braziller, 1978.

—. Studies in the Arts at Sinai: Essays. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1982.

Wild, Doris. Holy Icons in the Religious Art of the Eastern Church. Berne: Hallwag, 1961.

Williams, Rowan. The dwelling of the light: praying with icons of Christ. Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans, 2004.

—. Ponder these things: praying with icons of the Virgin. Franklin, Wis.: Sheed & Ward, 2002.

Zibawi, Mahmoud. The Icon: Its Meaning and History. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical Press, c1993.

Video/Audio Recordings

Andrei Rublev (In Russian with English subtitles). New York: Fox Lorber Home Video, 1992.

Contemplating Icons an Introduction to Icons and Prayer. Donnellson, Iowa: Heartbeat [distributor], 1989.

Driscoll, Jeremy. Praying with icons. [Sound Recording] St. Benedict, OR: Mount Angel Abbey, 2001. (Fr. Jeremy Driscoll is a monk of Mount Angel Abbey. All of the particular icons referred to in these conferences were “written” (i.e. painted) by iconographer Br. Claude Lane, O.S.B., also a monk of Mount Angel Abbey.)

The Form of Iconography. Orthodox Liturgical Arts Association, Inc., 1990.

Iconography, Egg Yolk Tempera Technique. Winter Park Fla.: Orthodox Liturgical Arts Association, Inc., 1986.

Life in a Medieval Monastery

The word “monastery” is derived from the Greek monos, meaning alone. Christian monasticism is generally regarded as a way of life involving persons living in seclusion from the world, under religious vows and subject to a fixed rule. Medieval monasticism had its roots in two distinct types of ascetic life practiced by Christians in early fourth century Egypt. The first type was the eremetical life of the desert hermits, whose most famous practitioner was St. Anthony. The other type was the cenobitical life of monks who lived together in organized communities, whose founder was said to be St. Pachomius. The monastic traditions of Egypt began to be known in the West beginning in the late fourth century, as literature about the lives of the desert fathers was disseminated, and individual monks traveled to and settled in Europe.

During the fifth and sixth centuries, monasteries were founded in Italy, Gaul, Spain, and Ireland. In Gaul, and later, England, double monasteries were common. These were establishments of monks and nuns who lived in separate quarters under the direction of an abbess. During this early stage of monastic development, there was no generally accepted rule that governed monastic life. In the West there were translations of various Eastern codes, such as the Rules of Pachomius and Basil. Another influential rule was St. Augustine’s famous letter on the management of convents of nuns. However, there was nothing that could be called a working code for the management of a monastery. This changed in the eighth century with the widespread adoption of the Rule of St. Benedict.

Benedict of Nursia was born near Spoleto, Italy, around the year 480. As a young man he lived as a hermit near the town of Subiaco, and his reputation for holiness was such that the monks of a nearby monastery asked him to become their abbot. Benedict’s first attempt at communal monastic living cannot be considered a success, since his fellow monks resented his strict rules and tried to poison him! He returned to Subiaco, and eventually founded his own monastery at Montecassino.

It was at Montecassino that Benedict composed his Rule for living in monastic communities. He envisioned the monastery as a reclusive and self-sufficient community, directed by an elected abbot. To lessen dependence on the secular word, the Rule decreed that everything essential for life, such as water, mills, gardens, and workshops, be found within the monastery walls. The church was always the most prominent building, and other buildings contained large rooms such as refectories and dormitories that reflected the group nature of monastic living. Benedict’s Rule emphasized the value of communal religious life, and outlined how a monk’s day was to be filled with prayer, manual labor and spiritual reading.

A monk’s day began with the ringing of bells, some time between midnight and two a.m., signaling the first prayers of the day. After a short nap, prayers were again held at sunrise, and then at three-hour intervals throughout the day. Communal prayers averaged about five hours per day, while private prayer and contemplation could take up to four more hours. Meals were served once a day in winter, twice in summer, with meat forbidden except in case of illness. Monks were required to be silent while eating, and developed a sign language to communicate. At least three hours per day were spent in manual labor, with remaining hours not spent in prayer devoted to study, especially of Latin, and sacred reading.

During the medieval period, monasteries were the centers of knowledge and education. They maintained schools and libraries, and were responsible for copying manuscripts. And although monasteries were founded with the idea of withdrawal from monastic life, they became a major force in the secular world of agriculture and government. They generally were founded by wealthy feudal lords, who then appointed their sons and daughters abbots and abbesses. (Monasteries were a convenient place to send second sons, who might become overly ambitious and seek to displace the oldest son in feudal succession. They were also useful refuges for daughters unable to find noble husbands.) Many monasteries became wealthy estates, with large land holdings that employed thousands of workers. Thus, the abbot or abbess of a large monastery could wield great secular power.

By the eleventh century, there began to be widespread dissatisfaction with the wealth and power the monasteries possessed. Several new monastic orders arose, inspired by the lives of the desert fathers and the Apostolic brotherhood, as well as the Benedictine rule itself. They sought a simpler form of religious life, with less dependence on the rents, serfs, and churches that provided income for the large monastic estates. The Carthusian and Cistercian Orders were the most prominent movements to arise from this reform.

The age of great monastic endowments was over by the end of the thirteenth century. In many Benedictine monasteries numbers declined, in part because of the end of the practice of donating children to be brought up as monks. Alternative forms of religious life, such as that of the friars, began to proliferate. Also, many monasteries, especially in Germany, refused to accept postulants that were not of noble birth, drastically limiting the number of potential recruits. In the latter part of the Middle Ages, a more relaxed form of Benedictine life was adopted and was acknowledged as valid by Pope Benedict XII in 1336. The age of Luther and the Reformation caused a precipitous decline in monastic vocations, and it wasn’t until the reform movements of the nineteenth century that monastic life began its revival.

Sources

Cantor, Norman F. The Medieval World 300-1300. New York: Macmillan, 1968

The Middle Ages: a concise encyclopedia. New York: Thames and Hudson, 1989

New Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1967

What Life Was Like in the Age of Chivalry. Alexandria, VA: Time-Life Books, 1997

Medieval Monasticism Bibliography

Selected Books

Monasticism in the Middle Ages

France, James. The Cistercians in medieval art. Kalamazoo, Mich. : Cistercian Publications, 1998. (BX3409 C497 no.170)

Elder, E. Rozanne. The New monastery : texts and studies on the earliest Cistercians. Spencer, Mass. : Cistercian Publications, 1998. (BX3415 C497 no.60)

Herman of Tournai. The restoration of the Monastery of Saint Martin of Tournai. Washington, D.C. : Catholic University of America Press, c1996. (BX2612.T6 H4713)

Logan, F. Donald. Runaway religious in medieval England, c. 1240-1540. New York : Cambridge University Press, 1996. (BX2592 L64)

Burton, Janet E. Monastic and religious orders in Britain, 1000-1300. New York Cambridge University Press, 1994. (BX2592 .B86)

Milis, Ludovicus. Angelic monks and earthly men : monasticism and its meaning to medieval society. Rochester, NY: Boydell Press, 1992. (BX2470 .M52)

King, James Cecil. The culture of the Abbey of St. Gall : an overview. Stuttgart : Belser, 1991. (NX663.S9 K8413)

Grégoire, Réginald. The monastic realm. New York : Rizzoli, 1985. (BX2470 .G7413)

Lawrence, C. H. Medieval monasticism : forms of religious life in western Europe in the Middle Ages. New York : Longman, 1984. (BX2470 .L435)

Bishko, Charles Julian. Spanish and Portuguese monastic history 600-1300. London : Variorum Reprints, 1984. (BX2654 .B541)

Guibert. Self and society in Medieval France : the memoirs of Abbot Guibert of Nogent. Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, 1984. (BX4705.G85 A33)

Moorman, John R. H. Medieval Franciscan houses. St. Bonaventure University, 1983. (BX3606.2 .M788)

Bolton, Brenda. The medieval reformation. London : Edward Arnold, 1983. (BX2470 .B639)

Panagopoulos, Beata. Cistercian and mendicant monasteries in medieval Greece. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1979. (NA5593 .P36 1979)

Butler, Lionel Harry. Medieval monasteries of Great Britain. London : Joseph, 1979. (BX2592 .B977)

Zarnecki, George. The monastic achievement. New York, McGraw-Hill <1972>. (BX2432 .Z37 1972)

Hunter Blair, Peter. The world of Bede. New York, St. Martin’s Press <1971, c1970>. (BR67.B4 Z5, H86)

Jocelin de Brakelond. The chronicle of Jocelin of Brakelond, monk of St. Edmundsbury. New York, Cooper Square Publishers, 1966. (DA690.B97 J6)

Leclercq, Jean. The history of medieval spirituality. 1960. (BV5082.2 .L42)

Swartwout, Robert Egerton. The monastic craftsman, an inquiry into the services of monks to art in Britain and in Europe north of the Alps during the middle ages. Cambridge W. Heffer and Sons, ltd., 1932. (N5970 .S8)

Fuhrmann, Joseph. Irish medieval monasteries on the continent. Washington, 1927. (BX2590 .F8 1927)

Monasticism for Women in the Middle Ages

Makowski, Elizabeth M. Canon law and cloistered women : Periculoso and its commentators, 1298-1545. Washington, D.C. : Catholic University of America Press, c1997. (BQV230 487 .M34)

Venarde, Bruce L. Women’s monasticism and medieval society : nunneries in France and England, 890-1215. Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 1997. (BX4220.E85 V46)

Schmitt, Miriam. Medieval women monastics : wisdom’s wellsprings. Collegeville, Minn. : Liturgical Press, 1996. (BX4200 .M43)

Bell, David N. What nuns read : books and libraries in medieval English nunneries. Kalamazoo, MI : Cistercian Publications, 1995. (BX3409 .C497)

Gilchrist, Roberta. Religious women in medieval East Anglia : history and archaeology c1100-1540. University of
East Anglia ; 1993. (BX4220.G7 G55)

Johnson, Penelope D. Equal in monastic profession : religious women in Medieval France. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1991.  (BX4220.F8 J64)

Holloway, Julia. Equally in God’s image : women in the Middle Ages. New York : P. Lang, c1990. (HQ1143 .E68)

Thompson, Sally. Women religious : the founding of English nunneries after the Norman Conquest. New York : Oxford University Press, 1991. (BX2592 .T56)

Elkins, Sharon K. Holy women of twelfth-century England. Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1988. (BX4220.G7 E45)

Nichols, John A Medieval religious women. Kalamazoo, Mich. : Cistercian Publications, 1984. (BX4210.M345)

Maycock, Alan. Saint Mary’s Abbey. Kent: St. Mary’s Abbey, c1953. (BX4631.M3)

Journals

Bulletin of medieval canon law
Cahiers de civilisation médiévale
Medieval philosophy & theology
Journal of medieval and Renaissance studies
Medieval archaeology
Mediaeval studies
Medievalia et humanistica
Le Moyen âge
Nuovi studi medievali
Patristica et mediaevalia
Recherches de théologie et philosophie médiévales
Speculum
Traditio

Videos

Social history of the Middle Ages : life in a monastery. St. Benedict, Ore. : Mount Angel Abbey Library, 1990. (ACV4 .S6624)

The Medieval monastery a photographic essay. University of Toronto for the Centre for Medieval Studies: 1979. (ACV4 .M4243)

Web Sites

The Catholic Encyclopedia: Monasticism
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10459a.htm

The Catholic Encyclopedia: The Rule of St. Benedict
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02436a.htm

Medieval Architecture: Abbeys and Monasteries
http://www.netserf.org/Architecture/Abbeys_Monasteries/

Medieval People: Religious Figures
http://www.netserf.org/People/Religious/

Medieval Religion: Holy Orders
http://www.netserf.org/Religion/Religious_Orders/

Reformation Bibliography

PDF bibliography guide

Samoa Bibliography

A Guide to Resources in the Mount Angel Abbey Library

Updated September 15, 2009

Partially through the generosity of Cardinal Pio Taofinu’u (+ 2006) of Apia, Western Samoa, Mount Angel Abbey Library has been building a substantial collection of books on Samoa.

English Language Books on Samoan History and Culture

Buzacott, Aaron. Mission Life in the Islands of the Pacific. 1866; Suva, Fiji: Institute of Pacific Studies of the University of the South Pacific, 1985.

Calkins, Fay G. My Samoan Chief. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1971.

Churchward, William B. My Consulate in Samoa. 1887; London: Dawson,1971.

Consolata, Sister Mary, SMSM. Samoa with Love: Reminiscences of Forty-five Years. Waltham, Massachusetts: Marist Missionary Sisters, 1991.

Ellison, Joseph Waldo. Opening and Penetration of Foreign Influence in Samoa to 1880. Corvallis: Oregon State College, 1938.

Fairbairn-Dunlop, Peggy. Tamaitai Samoa: Their Stories. Carson, California: KIN Publications / Suva, Fiji: The Institute of Pacific Studies, University of the South Pacific, 1998. See repeated reference, below, under “bibliography.”

Faleomavaega, Eni F.H., Navigating the Future: A Samoan Perspective on U.S. Pacific Relations. KIN Publications / Suva, Fiji: The Institute of Pacific Studies, University of the South Pacific, 1995.

Field, Michael J. Mau. Samoa’s Struggle against New Zealand Oppression. Wellington, New Zealand: A. H. & A. W. Reed, 1984.

Governance in Samoa: Pulega I Samoa. Eds. Elise Huffer and Asofou So’o. Suva, Fiji: Institute of Pacific Studies of the University of the South Pacific, 2000.

Gray, John A. C. Amerika Samoa. 1960; New York: Arno, 1980.

Henry, Brother Fred. History of Samoa. Apia, Western Samoa: Commercial Printers, 1979.

Heslin, Rev. Fr. Joseph, SM. A History of the Roman Catholic church in Samona 1845-1995. Ed. M.B. Tyquin. Forward by Cardinal Pio Taofinu’u. Apia, Western Samoa, 1995. [Alternate pages are in Samoan as: O Le Talatu’ufaasolo E Ekalesia Katoliko I Samoa 1845-1995. ]

Historical Sketch of the Naval Administration of the Government of American Samoa, April 17, 1909—July 1,1951. Washington, D.C.: USGPO,1952.

Kennedy, Paul. The Samoan Tangle. A Study in Anglo-German-American Relations. Dublin: Irish University Press, 1974.

Laugen. Samoan Oratory. Apia, Western Samoa: National University of Samoa, 1987.

Tu’i, Tatupu Fa’afetai Mata’afa. Lauga. Samoan Oratory. Suva, Fiji: Institute of Pacific Studies of the University of the South Pacific, 1987.

Marquandt, Carl. The Tattooing of Both Sexes in Samoa. Original German 1899; Papakura: MacMillan, 1984.

Meleisea, Malama. et al. Lagaga: A Short History of Western Samoa. Suva, Fiji: Institute of Pacific Studies of the University of the South Pacific, 1987.

Meleisea, Malama. O Tama Uli. Melanesians in Samoa. Suva, Fiji: Institute of Pacific Studies, University of the South Pacific, 1980.

— The Making of Modern Samoa: Traditional Authority and Colonial Administration in the Modern History of Western Samoa. Suva, Fiji: Institute of Pacific Studies of the University of the South Pacific, 1987.

Naval Actions and History, 1799-1898. Boston: Military Historical Society of Massachusetts, 1902. Contains an article dealing with a hurricane in Samoa in 1889.

Robson, R. W. Queen Emma. Sydney, Australia: Pacific Publications, 1979.

Tala o le Vavau: The Myths, Legends and Customs of Old Samoa. Rev. ed. 1976; Auckland:NZ: Polynesian Press, 1987.

Tom, Nancy Y. W. The Chinese in Western Samoa, 1875- 1985. The Dragon Came from Afar. Apia, Western Samoa: Western Samoa Historical and Cultural Trust, 1986.

Turner, George. Samoa: A Hundred Years Ago and Long Before. 1884; Institute of Pacific Studies, University of the South Pacific, 1984.

— Samo. Nineteen Years in Polynesia. 1861; Apia, Western Samoa: Western Samoa Historical and Cultural Trust, 1986.

Wendt, Jennifer. A Title Bestowal in Western Samoa. Auckland, NZ: Longman Paul, 1987.

Wendt, Albert.
Albert Wendt was born in Western Samoa and educated in New Zealand, wherein he gained an M.A. in history from Victoria University, Wellington. He then became a professor of Pacific Literature at the University of the South Pacific

— The Birth and Death of the Miracle Man: a Collection of Short Stories. Auckland, NZ: Penguin, 1986.

— Flying Fox in a Freedom Tree and Other Stories. Auckland, NZ: Penguin, 1988.

— Leaves of the Banyan Tree. Auckland, NZ: Penguin, 1979.

— Pouliuli. 1977; Auckland, NZ: Penguin, 1987.

Anthropological Studies—Margaret Mead and Her Critics

Caton, Hiram. The Samoa Reader. Anthropologists Take Stock. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1990.

Freeman, Derek. Margaret Mead and Samoa. Cambridge: Harvard, 1983.

Holmes Lowell Don, ed. Quest for the Real Samoans: The Mead / Freeman Controversy and Beyond. South Hadley, MA: Bergin and Garvin, 1987.

Mead, Margaret. Coming of Age in Samoa. New York: Morrow, 1928.

Samoa and Samoans Today

Baker, Paul T., ed. The Changing Samoans. New York: Oxford, 1986.

Janes, Craig. Migration, Social Change and Health. A Samoan Community in Urban California. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1990.

Ngan-Woo, Feleti E. Faasamoa: The World of Samoans. New Zealand: Office of the Race Relations Conciliator, 1985.

Sutter, Frederic Koehler. Samoa: A Photographic Essay. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1971.

The Samoan Language

Hunkin, Alfred. Gagana Samoa. A Samoan Language Coursebook. Auckland, NZ: Polynesian Press, 1988. (includes cassette)

Marsack, C. C. Teach Yourself Samoan. London: English Universities Press, 1962.

Schultz, E. Samoan Proverbial Expressions. Alaga’upu fa’a – Samoa. Trans. Brother Herman.1953; Auckland, NZ: Polynesian Press, 1980.

Christian Writings in Samoan

O Le Tusi Paia. O Le Feagauga Tuai Ma Le Feagaiga Fou Ma Apokerifa. N. p1.: The Bible Society in the South Pacific, 1969. Approved by Cardinal Pio for Catholic use.

Tusi Mo Aiga Tapua’I Faatasi. Christian Family Prayer Book. Samoan-English. Apia, Western Samoa: Diocese of Samoa and Tokelau, 1979.

Bibliography

Fairbairn-Dunlop, Peggy. Tamaitai Samoa: Their Stories. Carson, California: KIN Publications / Suva, Fiji: The Institute of Pacific Studies, University of the South Pacific, 1998. This book includes a detailed and wide-ranging bibliography of literature about Samoa, especially concerning topics of Samoan history and culture.

Holmes, Lowell D., ed. Samoan Island Bibliography. Wichita, KS: Poly Concepts, 1984.

Web-based / Internet Resources

 

Questia Online Library

A search for “bibliography, Samoa” yielded over 1800 books, plus a few journal articles.

Walker Percy Bibliography

Novels

The Moviegoer (Knopf, 1961)

The Last Gentleman (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1966)

Love in the Ruins (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1971)

Lancelot (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1977)

The Second Coming (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1980)

The Thanatos Syndrome (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1987)

Philosophical Essays

The Message in the Bottle: How Queer Man Is, How Queer Language Is, and What One Has to Do with the Other (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1975)

Lost in the Cosmos: The Last Self-Help Book (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1983)

Signposts in a Strange Land. Ed. Patrick Samway. (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1991)

Bibliographies

Andrew Lytle, Walker Percy, Peter Taylor: a Reference Guide. Boston: G. K. Gall, 1983.

Hobson, Linda Whitney. Walker Percy: A Comprehensive Descriptive Bibliography. New Orleans: Faust, 1988. (Hobson became a friend of Percy’s, after she wrote her dissertation on him.)

Wright, Stuart T. Walker Percy, a Bibliography, 1930-1984. Westport: Meckler, 1986.

Studies

Brinkmeyer, Robert H. Three Catholic Writers of the Modern South. Jackson: U of Mississippi P, 1985. (Allen Tate, Caroline Gordon, Walker Percy).

Coles, Robert. Walker Percy, An American Search. Boston: Little Brown, 1978. (Coles was a close friend of Percy’s, whose opinions Percy greatly valued. Yet Percy felt that Coles may have overlooked the darker, more malicious side of his nature, precisely because Coles himself is such a decent man.

Hardy, John Edward. The Fiction of Walker Percy. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1987. (A meticulous reading of Percy’s novels).

Hawkins, Peter S. The Language of Grace: Flannery O’Connor, Walker Percy & Iris Murdoch. Cambridge: Mass: Cowley, 1983.

Hobson, Linda Whitney. Understanding Walker Percy. Columbia, SC; U of South Carolina P, 1988.

Howland, Mary Deems. The Gift of the Other: Gabriel Marcel’s Concept of intersubjectivity in Walker Percy’s Novels. Pittsburgh: Duquesne U P, 1990.

Lawson, Lewis A. Following Percy: Essays on Walker Percy’s Work. Troy, NY: Whitston, 1988. Lawson was one of the first scholars to attempt to relate Percy’s fiction and non-fiction works. He carried on an increasingly cordial, twenty-five year correspondence with Percy.

—., and Victor A. Kraemer, eds. Conversations with Walker Percy. Jackson: U of Mississippi P, 1985.

Luschei, Martin. The Sovereign Wayfarer: Walker Percy’s Diagnosis of the Malaise. Baton Rouge: L S U Press, 1972. (A reworked dissertation, this book “impressed Percy by its generosity and by its thorough explication of the intellectual substructure of his fiction.”

Percy, William Alexander (1885-1942). Lanterns of the Levee: Recollections of a Planter’s Son. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State U P, 1973 [1941]. (Walker Percy wrote the introduction to this re-issue of his Uncle Will’s book.)

Poteat, Patricia Lewis. Walker Percy and the Old Modern Age. Baton Rouge: Louisiana S U P, 1985. (Poteat critiques Percy’s language theories. She thinks his theoretical work is self-contradictory, but that his novels provide a more cogent critique of Cartesianism.)

Reid Broughton, Panthea, ed. The Art of Walker Percy: Strategems for Being. Baton Rouge: L S U Press, 1979.

Spivey, Ted Ray. The Writer as Shaman: the Pilgrimages of Conrad Aiken and Walker Percy. Macon, GA: Mercer U P, 1986.

Taylor, L. Jerome. In Search of Self, Life, Death, and Walker Percy. Cambridge, MA: Cowley, 1986.

Tharpe, Jac. Walker Percy, Art and Ethics. Jackson: U P of Mississippi, 1980.

—. Walker Percy. Boston: Twayne, 1983.

Wood, Ralph C. The Comedy of Redemption: Christian Faith and Comic Vision in Four American Novelists. Notre Dame: U Notre Dame Pr, 1988. (Percy, Updike, O’Connor, De Vries. Percy appreciated Wood’s close readings of his work.)

Walker Percy Biography

Walker Percy, a Southerner, turned to writing as a profession when he was in his mid-30s, after having completed medical school, spent time in tuberculosis sanitoria, married a straightforward, intelligent wife endowed with profound common sense, and joined the Catholic Church. From then on, he worked at his demanding craft with great fidelity, producing six highly regarded novels and three volumes of philosophical essays.

Percy’s medical specialty was pathology. He became a pathologist of modern and post-modern culture. Like Kierkegaard, he found the people around him to be in despair without knowing it. His novels explore what it means to confront this despair and to seek a way out of it. In the end Percy was convinced that the only sure path out of the morass was to embrace the Christian (and specifically the Catholic) faith.

Percy was the scion of a very old and honorable Southern family who had left their distinguished mark on the delta region of Mississippi. Both his father and grandfather committed suicide, and his mother was drowned in a car accident when Walter was still a schoolboy. After that Walter was brought up by his Uncle Will, a lapsed Catholic who lived the Southern gentleman’s creed of Stoicism and honor. Uncle Will was also a very serious reader, who welcomed many famous and not so famous artists and writers to his home. Percy’s father had read aloud to his sons, and Uncle Will continued the practice.

All his life Walker was a shy person who need a great deal of time by himself with his thoughts and his pen. Although his strong faith warded off the family melancholy, he was moody. At two crucial points in his life, it was a trip to the wide open spaces of the West which helped call him back from the brink of despair.

Walker Percy and his wife Bunt, and their two daughters, the first adopted, the second deaf, were a very close and loving family. They chose to live most of their lives in the town of Covington, across the lake from New Orleans and near St. Joseph’s Abbey, where Percy was buried. Percy’s wide circle of relatives and friends included his childhood pal, Shelby Foote, novelist and author of an acclaimed three-volume history of the Civil War, and Robert Cole, the Harvard psychiatrist.

All of Percy’s writings are permeated by his faith. His primary quarrel was with scientism, the view that science held the key to human happiness. He was not sure that happiness was something one should hope for or expect in this life, and he was sure that science could not provide it. He wrestled all his life with melancholic inheritance and with the Southern code of honor, particularly as these were embodied in his father and uncle respectively. He might easily have shared Cormac McCarthy’s apparent nihilism, had it not been for his religious faith. He championed liberal causes, but denounced liberal ideology.

Percy was fascinated with the nature of language. He felt that it was a socially given capacity, without which one could not think the real. His explorations into semiotics were enriched both by his devoted efforts to teach his hearing-impaired daughter to read and by some studies he did on communication in the families of schizophrenics for a friend in the National Institute for Mental Health.

Percy won many awards for his novels. He was certainly one of the best American novelists of the second half of the twentieth century, but it is not clear that his works will become an enduring part of the canon. About his philosophical essays there is even less certainty.

Walker Percy has been well-served by secondary works. One of the most comprehensive (it critiques not only Walker Percy’s works but the existing works about him) studies of Percy is the biography of Jay Tolson.

Textbooks for Spring 2019

Textbooks are available for purchase at the Abbey Bookstore and Coffeehouse, just north of the Saint Benedict Post Office and across from the Abbey cemetery.

Please note, while we make every effort to keep the booklist as up to date as possible, the information is subject to change without notice. Please be sure to have the most current information as possible from your professor.